What To Do When Your Path In Life Is Chosen For You

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I am a typical twenty-three-year-old who just finished my first year in the workforce. I’m adapting (and sometimes struggling with) post-grad life in solidarity with my peers: I’m learning how to cook, I’ve lost at least 40 percent of my sock collection to the laundry, and I’m trying not to screw anything up at work. But what makes me atypical from my contemporaries, who intend to stay at their current jobs for the next two, maybe three years, is that I intend to keep my first job for the next forty-plus years.

When I arrived at work on my first day in the “real world,” and every day since, it was my name on the door in big, bold letters. I wish I could say this is because I have done something extraordinary this year to bring meaning to that name, but its reputation has been built by many Gersons before me, first by my grandfather and now my father. It’s a lot of weight on a twenty-three-year-old shoulders. An eighty-two-year legacy, more than one hundred dependent workers, and an expectation that it will be my responsibility to care for all of it in the decades to come.

Growing up, this duty was met with a lot less trepidation. If asked what I wanted to be when I grew up, I would joyously reply that I knew I was going to be the CEO of Gerson & Gerson, Inc. Perhaps as a result of a childhood shaped as much by family events as the ups and downs of the fashion industry, the business became an integral part of my identity. With the understanding that the name Gerson had meaning beyond my nuclear family—a reputation for ability, integrity, and honesty—I spent most of my childhood trying to achieve these ideals. With each nomination to the class council, captainship of a sports team, citizenship award, and finally an acceptance to an Ivy League university, I continued to crave validation.

The privilege of having a family business is a double-edged sword. The reputation of the next generation’s perceived entitlement is an insecurity I have combatted my entire life. I have long accepted that I would need to work harder than my peers to receive the same recognition of ability for my roles, especially since I belong to a generation that is largely characterized as entitled and narcissistic. At some point, I realized that the notion that I could be recognized purely on my own merit was unrealistic. The reality is that I am in this very extraordinary professional position due to my name, and not my achievements. The best I can hope for is that by virtue of my competence as a student, as well as my dedication and work ethic, that the people around me will view me as worthy of the entitlement.

I graduated college at twenty-two, armed with a business education and a lifetime of industry knowledge. I entered the firm just one month after graduation. Some might call my inexperience an impediment, but I view my ignorance as an asset. I will never know as much as my predecessors do about the business they currently run, but asking disruptive questions and bringing a fresh perspective is often my most valuable contribution. The freedom to ask any question that might seem otherwise embarrassing, without fear, has allowed me to acquire both an understanding of the industry and a chance to make small improvements along the way.

My education had taught me the practical skills of business planning, and I was fully prepared to leave my mark on the company with grand ideas of modernization and branding. I discovered that I was not only stepping into a business, with its operational and industry challenges, but I was also inheriting a culture: a rich company history that has engendered a culture of dedication and honesty but at the same time, inflexibility and entrenchment in a “way to do things.” When an entity has been building momentum for so long, the slightest change in direction is difficult to achieve. This is exasperating to an energetic, entrepreneurial thinker eager to chart a new course. It is also something I have grown to regard as the most precious asset in our firm. The invaluable passion for protecting and maintaining something we have all worked to build must be met with enormous respect. I learned that effecting change within the company must strike a constant balance between honoring tradition, maintaining the culture, and shifting toward a new vision.

Ironically, the legacy that I initially found so daunting has become the most comforting part of this journey. I arrived eager to prove myself and my abilities, spent so long focused on combating an impostor complex, and finally found something much greater. Being third generation to a company is not only my journey; it is the story of the past two generations, the people who work for and with Gerson & Gerson, who have become part of our family along the way, and hopefully the generations who come after me. Letting go of my ego and allowing myself to serve the company and the people connected to this legacy is both my greatest challenge and my most powerful motivation.

My love and dedication to Gerson & Gerson are what has helped me to gain credibility within the firm, to push myself to accept this position at a young age, and to be part of the 13 percent of third generation family businesses that succeed. I strongly subscribe to the notion of following your passions as a means for success, as belonging to a family business goes far beyond seeking financial gain. There are endless ways to work toward particular interests within the company; focusing on branding and innovation in small markets is where I have found my satiation for an entrepreneurial and fast-paced environment. Beyond personal interests, it is also the opportunity to work in a place that is worth fighting to protect. Where a business is more than just business, it is family. I will continue to carry on the Gerson legacy, out of necessity, drive, and passion for this eighty-two-year journey.

Millennials like me were raised in a world where we were constantly told, “chart your own course.” But sometimes you don’t get to choose your own path. Sometimes it is chosen for you, for better or for worse, by your name, a circumstance, or a series of events. It is up to you to decide what you want to do with it, and how to grasp what is both an extraordinary opportunity and an extraordinary challenge.

Jessica Gerson is a 2015 graduate of Cornell University, where she earned a B.S. from the Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management. She is the third generation of her family business, Gerson & Gerson, Inc., which she joined after graduation. Gerson & Gerson, Inc. is a leading design house and manufacturer of children’s clothing and is most known for its brand of girls’ dresses, Bonnie Jean. The company is celebrating its eighty-second year of bringing the joy and beauty of a new dress to girls around the world. Within the company, Jessica focuses on bringing innovation to small markets. She is an advocate for family business, and you can learn about Gerson & Gerson, Inc. at www.Gersonandgerson.com

This excerpt was borrowed with permission from the book 3 Billion Under 30 and its author, Jared Kleinert.

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