2018 Family Business Club officers elected

The conclusion of each calendar year also brings a transition in leadership with the Family Business Club . Under the leadership of co-Presidents Sabrina Fung Co and Aradhana Rae Gupta, Treasurer Kevin Kang and Vice President Ben Rashbaum, the club saw remarkable growth over the past year under their consistent leadership. Thank you, Sabrina, Aradhana, Kevin, and Ben. In 2018, we welcome the following slate of officers:

  • Adriano Campos, President
  • Ryan Limb, Executive Vice President of Student Engagement
  • Ben Rashbaum, Executive Vice President of Special Programs
  • Andres Ramirez, Treasurer
  • Christina Chen, Communications Chair
  • Gustavo M. Camargos, Vice President of Special Events

 

20172018

Lessons from the Cornell Families in Business Conference

We recently concluded the 3rd Anual Families in Business Conference at Cornell. The event brought together over 175 family business owners, Cornell alumni, and students for three days of exploration on the theme of “The Future of Family Business.” 

I was pleased to receive this email shortly after the conference, from Bruce Werner, Managing Director of Kona Advisors LLC, and a member of the Werner Ladder family business. With his permission, I share it with you:  

102717_FIBC_097

I have been told that getting to Cornell is difficult, but it is beautiful once you get there. That is certainly true. Here are a few thoughts I brought back from the Smith Family Business Initiative Conference.

The lessons of family business are timeless, but each family needs to learn for themselves. Being on campus, it reminded me of the freshman introductory courses. The same textbook is used every year,  but it is still new material for each class.

Like physics, the principles are universal, but what matters is how you apply this knowledge. I was in a discussion with two people. One recently sold a $1B business, while the other was the owner of a $250K business. Everyone was engaged in debating the issues, but they will use what they learned differently.

Managing conflict is everything. Good family governance allows owners to manage family conflict, which allows them to run a successful business. For obvious reasons, these issues don’t exist in public companies.

Money changes almost everything: expectations, effort, risk/reward appetite. How you deal with these changes likely determines your happiness. You can be successful, but not happy.

While these topics were discussed in the context of running family businesses, much of it equally applies to privately owned businesses.

Thank you for sharing Bruce. 

 

 

Smith Family Business Initiative creates connections across Cornell’s ecosystem

 

Daniel G. Van Der Vliet is the John and Dyan Smith Executive Director of Family Business at Johnson. We caught up with him recently for an update on the Smith Family Business Initiative.

Tell us about the Smith Family Business Initiative (SFBI).

We’ve tried to create a portal for all things family business—for students, for alumni, and for those who are within our network for any of our programs and offerings. Globally, family businesses represent as much as 90 percent of all firms, so it’s a significant slice of the world economy. Members of family businesses often have many opportunities coupled with complex challenges to figure out—whether to return to the business or not, whether to innovate and change or stick with what’s worked for generations.

At SFBI, we connect students who come from family businesses with alumni and business leaders who want to remain engaged with Cornell and see this as a much-needed resource. It’s exciting, because we get to work with businesses from across the economic spectrum, from the corner store and entrepreneurs just getting started, to some significant global players and iconic brands.

2016 Families in Business ConferenceNick Matt, MBA ’73. CEO and Chairman of FX Matt

Johnson just hired Margarita Tsoutsoura, associate professor and the first John and Dyan Smith Professor of Management and Family Business. What impact will this hire have on SFBI and Cornell?

Professor Tsoutsoura comes to us from the Chicago Booth School of Business, and she is a rising scholar in the family business field. Family business is still emerging as a research space, so the body of literature is rapidly being formed. Tsoutsoura brings added capacity for the initiative to increase family business–related curriculum across Cornell, and she is considered a genuine thought leader in this area of study.

Tsoutsoura will help elevate the field and get more family business articles published in top-tier journals. We hope she will also inspire other faculty, here at Cornell, but also in her own network, to engage in top-level family business–related research.

SFBI is expanding its course offerings this year. What information can you share about the new classes?

Professor Tsoutsoura is currently developing two new courses. The first will be an undergraduate course covering the basics of family business—call it a “Family Business 101.”

The second course will be graduate level. Tsoutsoura’s training is in finance, so this course will be more technical in nature, dealing with how money flows in and out of the family and the business. The graduate course will likely appeal to those working in, or potentially with, family businesses. We’re finding that many of our students end up in consulting, investment banking, and other fields where, unbeknownst to them, they will find themselves working with many of these families.

We expect the undergraduate course to be delivered in spring of 2018, and we hope the graduate course will be ready by then as well.

What role does SFBI play within the SC Johnson College of Business?

Having a program like SFBI with academic as well as programmatic capacity, embedded within a university like Cornell that has such great breadth and depth of expertise across many different academic areas, really helps to differentiate not just the College of Business but all of Cornell, at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

We are beginning to see students choose Cornell because of the family business program. As SFBI continues to develop and the network and academic offerings grow, it will only help to further differentiate the college.

There are so few schools that embrace family business wholeheartedly. Particularly among our peer schools, very few have comprehensive programs. If Cornell continues in this direction, it bodes well for the future.

What are SFBI’s long-term goals?

In entrepreneurial terms, we’re just getting started. Eventually, SFBI needs to grow into a center, meaning cross-disciplinary, cross-college activity at the undergraduate and graduate levels, with multiple faculty members engaged in research and as practitioners.

That’s going to require additional funding for research and additional staff and faculty lines. Because of the SC Johnson gift, with its challenge component, we’ve already started to see some gifts coming in benefiting family business, and we hope that will continue.

Whether you are a student, a member of a family business, or someone seeking resources to help you work with family businesses, I see Cornell becoming the global resource for family business.

2016 Families in Business Conference
L-R Jessica Gerson, 15, VP, Gerson & Gerson, Marisa Sergi, 15, CEO, Redhead Wines, Pablo Borquez Schwarzbeck (MBA 15), CEO, Produce Pay

How can people connect with SFBI?

There are numerous opportunities for alumni to come back to campus and participate in a conference, be a panelist, or be a supporter. In 2018, there will be more opportunities to connect in New York City as well. Because we’re still young, it’s all about growing the network. I encourage alumni to reach out and get added to our list, since we are actively trying to connect students, alumni, and businesses in the Cornell ecosystem.

The 2017 Families in Business Conference, “The Future of Family Business” will be held October 25–27, 2017, at the Statler Hotel in Ithaca.

Leadership Lessons from a Family Business CEO

Submitted by Ujjval Shah, MBA 18

Imagine being a part of the fourth oldest family-owned brewery in the United States, having brewed beer since 1888. That’s what Nick Matt (MBA 73) came to when he was called upon to lead the then-struggling Matt Brewing Company in 1989. Having been on track to be the CEO of a much larger company – Richardson Vicks (now purchased by P&G) he made the call to leave that job to steward the family business out of troubled waters. Ask him now how he made that decision and he says with a smile “it’s about family, there’s a 100-year-old family run business that might go under and so you’ve got to step up.”

Things weren’t easy for him though. Notwithstanding the multi-million dollars the company was losing year over year, there was also the situation of Nick becoming the chairman by replacing his older brother, who would technically work under him now. Nick describes this shift in power as “awkward”. This is something many family businesses have to go through. Balancing work and family is delicate and Nick says the key is to be sensitive to people and their needs. Moreover, having worked in a major multinational before coming to the family business, Nick came in with a lot of confidence and that he says helped rally his employees and family behind him. Says Nick “I had a lot of sleepless nights but no one knew that. I had this never give up attitude which I think percolated to everyone else.” He also mentioned that to succeed as a leader it’s important that people see you as authentic which is his secret to being comfortable with leadership.

As we got to talking more, the beer flowed and so did time. Nick has this playful, almost childlike, demeanor which immediately makes his audience comfortable. Being the modest individual he is, he accepts the role of serendipity in his success at the brewery. “We decided to put all our resources behind Saranac – a product only responsible for 2% of our sales at the time. It is pure chance it worked out. No one could have predicted how the craft beer market exploded” he says.

Soon it was time to make our 2-hour journey back to Ithaca and we asked him for a parting word of advice for newly minted MBAs like us. He said “Never take business decisions without proper research. Knowing your limitations as an individual as well as a leader is imperative so that you can consult more knowledgeable experts and take the right decisions.” Being eager to learn Johnson MBA’s we did just that and asked for his expert advice on the best freshly brewed beers to take back with us along with our memories.

From left to right: Virginia Dellizzotti (AMBA ’18), Ujjval Shah (AMBA ’18), Nick Matt (MBA ’73), Chris Massari (AMBA ’18)

Why go for an MBA when you are going into your family business anyway?

Recently we concluded our Leaders in Family Enterprise class.  With nearly 40 students enrolled, from 1st generation entrepreneurs to 7th generation legacy businesses, we had an amazing diversity of individuals and backgrounds represented. Students were asked to reflect weekly on each speaker or to encapsulate their thoughts from the entire semester.  I’ve taken a few quotes and words shared, either from class, in papers, or spoken directly to myself.

Specific quotes throughout the semester:  

  • “After going through all of the assigned readings prior to class, I am convinced I now want to quit my family business.”
  • “The weekly speaker … was a force of nature and was just so engaging that I would have stayed an extra hour if I had to.”
  • “I shared with the assistant dean how important this course was and that we need more courses like this; it was immediately applicable and completely different than any other course I have taken thus far at Cornell.” 
  • “After hearing this lecture, I think I AM the Fredo in my family. But a good Fredo.”
  • “I just wanted to take this opportunity to thank you wholeheartedly for having provided me with so much of perspective related to family managed businesses via your course. The lectures were insightful and taught me many important lessons. I look forward to keeping them in mind once I go back to India and take over my family-managed business.” 
  • “I got a lot more out of this course than I expected to, from both the theory and scholarly study of family business, and the real world experiences and examples from the family business owners and operators who presented to the class.“
  • “As a direct result of this class, and the emphasis that so many of the speakers put on firmly setting succession planning, having open and frank conversations with your family and having clear and stated roles within any family business, I plan to set up a meeting with my Aunt over the summer to do exactly that.”

Reflections on family business: 

Why go for an MBA when you are going into your family business anyway?”. I typically go with a joking response of, “oh… this is a vacation for me (insert awkward chuckle… quickly switch to next topic)”. After all, I could hardly relate to the stresses of what most MBA students go thru of balancing studies with recruiting. There is a misconception of people who work in their family businesses that they have it easy, that everything they got or achieved is because of nepotism. I disagree. While they may balance work and school, we balance work and family 24/7- which I think is infinitely more demanding. Some might argue that one has the benefit of leaving the family business but be secure in having an alternative to fall back on if something does not pan out. Very few people understand the nuances of working for your own family business– the pressure in ensuring that it succeeds and that you do the family name proud. If anything, an MBA is most especially crucial to develop us as better, well-rounded team members and leaders because we are not as privy to criticism or feedback as others who work for companies. Additionally, an MBA is beneficial because it gives us the opportunity to shine for our own actions alone.”

“To be honest, on the first day of this class, I was confused. I thought I understood what a family business was, but when we were going around the classroom and everyone was sharing what their family business was, I became a little self-conscious and was not even sure if what my family had would really count.  What my family has is a 400-acre farm in southern New Hampshire, which my great-grandfather purchased in the 1930s.  On the farm, we make maple syrup, grow hay and raise sheep, but the farm has operated and basically break even or at small losses for really its entire existence.  On the farm, we have one full time farmer who basically runs the operations, and I always viewed the farm as more of a hobby for my mother, my uncle and my grandparents for after they retired. There were some tax benefits of operating a farm, and yes I worked on it during summers as a teenager, but I was never quite sure how to classify it.  However, after going through this class, hearing stories about others’ family businesses, and diving deeper into family business studies, I found a heightened appreciation for what my family has been doing for 80 years, and proudly understand the complexity of our family farm.”

I am left thinking how important this course is, especially for those coming from family businesses. Regardless of age, program of study or cultural background, all students shared a common bond of desiring to understand their role within the family and business more fully. Weekly speakers balanced practice and theory and all displayed brutal honesty in telling their own stories as they related to family business.  Thank you to all the speakers who shared their time and talents for this year’s class.

2017 FEUSA Family Business Survey

downloadFamily Enterprise USA is a 501 (c)(3) organization dedicated to educating lawmakers and growing public support for family businesses across America. Each year, Family Enterprise USA surveys business owners across the country to learn about their challenges and ensures that their voices are heard on Capitol Hill.

Based on the findings of the 2017 study, which is an aggregate of thoughts and opinions from 186 family-owned businesses, we learned the following:

  • Most family businesses (76%) saw their business revenue grow in 2016 and are confident about the business’ ability to increase revenue each year.
  • The majority (72%) say they plan to hire additional employees in 2017, an increase from 66% in 2016.
  • Business owners share, in their own words, the impact of the regulations on their business. The common themes are around estate taxes costing money, resources and time that they could have put into growing their business.
  • Aside from creating jobs, 92% of business owners pursue civic engagement by sharing their time, talents and resources in their communities.

Please click this link to read the entire 2017 report. For comparison, if you like to also read the 2016 report, please click here to download it.

Flocks, families, and organizations

One of the greatest contributions of Bowen Theory to the understanding of groups (families, organizations, or societies), is the following: the functioning of the individual is governed by the group. Theory also points out that if an individual can raise his functioning in relationship to other group members, others predictably raise their functioning as well, bringing the whole group to a different level. This reciprocal influence represents an aspect of the emotional system at work.

If this postulate is true, this mutual influence between the individual and the group should be observable not only in humans, but in other groups in the natural world. Not surprisingly, scientists that study group behaviors (in humans and non-human groups) have described this phenomena. Among them, Ian Cousin (1) in his account of animal migration says: “If one individual is confused, it can follow others. When its own magnetic sensing or memory is stronger, it in turn becomes influential. So you have ever changing leadership according to the quality of information each individual possesses.”

The dialogue between Bowen Theory and natural science can result in an increased understanding of groups and how to navigate the challenges of being an individual while being part of the group. Discussing differentiation of self and anxiety as two main variables influencing this process contributes to comprehending the mechanism by which this unfolds. The conversation brings new light to important concepts such as leadership.

Michel Kerr (2) nicely summarizes the link between Bowen Theory and learning about groups in the natural world: “Striking parallels exists in the interactions of cells, ants, mammals, families, organizations and communities. Relationships systems at all levels respond to anxiety in predictable ways. Chronic anxiety can transform orderly cooperation into disruptive conflict. The keys to applying this knowledge are fathoming how a system works and one´s part in it. Bowen theory is sufficiently accurate to provide a reliable blueprint for change.”

References:

  1. Explorers. Bio. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.nationalgeographic.com/explorers/bios/lain-couzin/
  1. Kerr, M. (2001). From the Editor. Family Systems 5(2), 98-100.

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Dr. Mariana Martinez is faculty at the Bowen Center for the Study of the Family in Washington, DC.